Dartmouth Rowing's success is a combined effort. It starts with dedicated athletes and coaches, depends upon visionary athletic administrators, and thrives with loyal and supportive alumni and parents. The support of the College President and Dean of Admissions reflects Dartmouth's institutional belief that competitive athletics play an integral role in higher education. All of these constituents contribute to making Dartmouth crews fast. The effort is a team effort, and it extends well beyond the confines of the boathouse.

Within the heavyweight squad, success is the shared result of individual effort and sacrifice. Winning at Dartmouth is different than winning other places. Basic ingredients like hard work and persistence may be the same everywhere, but they're applied differently at Dartmouth. And they're applied in ways that are consistent with the core values of the best parts of a Dartmouth education. Personal initiative, shared passion, and cutting-edge innovation are hallmarks of the D-Plan and the Dartmouth educational experience, and they're essential ingredients for successful Dartmouth rowers. We seek rowers who realize that the choices they make are the best expression of who they are, and the choices we make as a team define who we are. We're looking for students who can recognize that some elements of college life can be toxic to the pursuit of athletic excellence, and our team thrives with those who choose to define themselves in opposition to anything incompatible with their highest academic and athletic aspirations.

Successful Dartmouth rowers maximize the resources and advantages offered by the D-Plan, Dartmouth Peak Performance, and Dartmouth Rowing's proprietary training to develop a capacity for inspiration. This capacity inspires their success when the stakes are highest and helps them become the best rower they can be because they chose Dartmouth. Successful Dartmouth oarsmen recognize that Dartmouth Rowing isn't for everyone, and that the dedication and sacrifice required to succeed on the water are often greater than what's required in other facets of campus life. But those students who make that commitment often find that the line between sacrifice and reward becomes blurry, and that no other experience better prepares them for success--at the Eastern Sprints, Olympic Games, or anywhere else in life off the water--than the experience they share at the boathouse.