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Mark Hiatt
Position: Sports Psychologist
Experience: 1st Year
As part of Dartmouth Peak Performance's goal to position our students-athletes for maximal physical, intellectual and personal growth, we have integrated the resource of sport psychology.  It operates under the assumptions that psychological factors affect athletic performance and conversely, participation in athletic competition affects the psyche.  The science of sport psychology blends the concepts of both psychology and kinesiology.  
With the integration of sports psychology, Dartmouth student-athletes will have a resource for becoming trained in the psychological skills of performance improvement.  These skills include concentration, goal setting, imagery, visualization, confidence, leadership, communication, team building and anxiety control.  Sports Psychology can also help train student-athletes to deal with the adverse aspects of being a collegiate athlete, such as injury, rehabilitation, time management and specific transitions throughout an athletics career.  Clinical psychologist Mark Hiatt, Ph.D, has partnered with Dartmouth Peak Performance to provide one-on-one sports performance counseling to student-athletes.

"I am very excited about the DP2 Program as a whole, and particularly the emphasis on sport/performance psychology.  Developing a strong mental game is very important in collegiate sports and can benefit students in numerous ways both in and out of athletics."

Hiatt is excited to supplement his work at Dick's House by working closely with Dartmouth student-athletes as part of Dartmouth Peak Performance.
 
"During my time at Dartmouth, I have had the great opportunity to work with many different athletes, as well as some teams, on issues related to performance and the development of mental skills."

Hiatt will work with both teams and individual student-athletes on honing the mental skills of performance by spending four hours a week working in the athletic-department. 

Mark Hiatt has been on the staff of Health Services since 2003.  He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Virginia in 2001 and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Dartmouth Medical School, Department of Psychiatry in 2002.

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