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Courtesy: Mark Cunningham

Ausmus '91 Named Manager of the Detroit Tigers

Courtesy: Dartmouth
Release: 11/06/2013
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DETROIT, Mich. — The Detroit Tigers announced over the weekend that Dartmouth alumnus Brad Ausmus ’91 has been hired to be the team’s manager. Ausmus had been serving as a special assistant to the general manager of the San Diego Padres for the past three years.

Ausmus replaces Jim Leyland, who was a manager for 22 seasons in the big leagues, including the last eight in Detroit. While Ausmus does not have any managerial experience in professional baseball, he did manage Team Israel at the 20112 World Baseball Classic.

Brad Ausmus
Brad Ausmus '91 has a special place in his heart for the Old English 'D'.  (photo courtesy of Mark Cunningham/Detroit Tigers)
Ausmus spent 18 years as a player in Major League Baseball, beginning with the Padres as a rookie in 1993. He had two stints with the Tigers and Houston Astros, playing 10 of his 18 seasons with the latter. His final two seasons were played with the Dodgers in Los Angeles before hanging up his spikes at the age of 41.

Ausmus was drafted by the New York Yankees in 1987 in the 48th round out of Cheshire Academy (Conn.). He worked out a deal in which he could sign a contract and still work toward his degree at Dartmouth, which he earned in five-and-a-half years. Ausmus spent five years in the Yankees organization before being selected in the expansion draft by the Colorado Rockies. Less than a year later, he was traded to the Padres and made his major league debut two days later on July 28, 1993.

A career .251 hitter in over 7,000 plate appearances, Ausmus was known for his skills behind the plate and handling of pitching staffs. He was a three-time Gold Glove recipient and an All-Star in 1999 for the Tigers when he posted a slash line of .275/.365/.415 with nine homers and 54 RBIs. He played in nearly 2,000 games during his career, including 1,938 as a catcher, which ranks seventh all-time in major league history.
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